Transnational corporation and human rights

Transnational corporations and human rights

Transnational corporations (TNCs) continue to reinforce their hold on the natural resources of the planet, dictating their agendas to the weakest countries and exploiting their peoples. Directly or indirectly, they bear an enormous responsibility for the deterioration of the environment and for the systematic increase of human rights violations .

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Transnational corporations (TNCs) continue to reinforce their hold on the natural resources of the planet, dictating their agendas to the weakest countries and exploiting their peoples. Directly or indirectly, they bear an enormous responsibility for the deterioration of the environment and for the systematic increase of human rights violations.

With this in mind, many organizations have relentlessly denounced the damaging effects committed by TNC across the world (Colombia, Nigeria, Mexico, etc.) and have fought for the implementation of an international legally binding framework. The United Nations represent, in this respect, the sole legitimate space to implement an international legislation acknowledged by everyone.

Thus, at some NGO’s instigation, notably the CETIM which has been following the issue for over 15 years, a Working Group was constituted in 1998 by the UN Sub-Commission for the Promotion and the Protection of Human Rights.

This brochure aims at presenting an appraisal of the current issue with respect to the activities of TNC at national, regional and international levels as well as what is at stake in the United Nations current debate over the “Norms on responsibilities of transnational corporations and other business enterprises with regards to human rights”. The brochure attempts to define more exhaustively the concept of transnational corporation by highlighting its principal characteristics. It also exposes practical cases of violations committed by TNC.

Additional Information

Author

Melik Özden

Collection

Human rights series

Editions

CETIM Publisher

Numero

2

Year

2006

ISBN

2-88053-041-5

Number of pages

74